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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and then when it came time to go to middle school, she wanted her daughter to apply for one of the city wide magnet schools and the people said she doesn't qualify because she doesn't have the the kills and knowledge that she needs. and the mom said what do you mean? she's gotten all as. and they said, no, look at her skills assessment. and the mom was horrified. and felt betrayed because she said if my kid is not able to compete with other kids in the city or other kids in the nation, i should know that. she shouldn't be getting all a and lulling me into a sense of complacency when she doesn't have what she needs. so while i think that we shouldn't have an overemphasis on the test and that is happening in some places, we have to have some accountability. >> and that leads to the yes question of standardized testing. it's a one size fits all measureme measurement. what do you say to that? >> i think we can always do a better job of making sure that we have great assessments, but we have to have a starting point. and we cannot continue to have school districts that produce generations of kids
a republican. it's monday, february 25th, and this is "now." >>> joining me today new york city deputy mayor howard wolfson, the queen bee of the greo.com joy reid, eric baits, a contributing he editor at "rolling stone" and a visiting scholar at new york university, and former rnc chairman and msnbc political analyst the notorious michael steel. with four days until the sequester deadline, lawmakers are taking a page from the shaggy playbook and saying it wasn't me. >> it's made up. it's been created. i didn't support the sequester because that's a stupid way to cut spending. >> i think the sequester was a stupid thing. i voted against it when it first came up. >> woodward said it was president obama who proposed and promoted the sequester. >> you have as usual in washington a large kabuki going on about who can get blamed. >> it came from the white house, and the president's aides. >> a psychologist and procrastination expert told the a.p., "congress is pretty much the worst, hands down, of any group we ever investigated. they're worse than college students." despite the fact that both sid
of it for the people that want it. forget about getting people that are outside of it. in new york city with neighborhoods with a lot of money, there are people on waiting lists. >> for, like -- for people who are wealthy. >> as to the argument that it fades as the kids -- you have a couple of quality pre-k education with full day kindergarten. full day kindergarten is enormously important. some of those things the state could pick up. when i became governor that was my frontal boundary one and you put one-third of the billion dollars into pre-k and full day, and by the team i left in my eighth year pennsylvania kids finished first in the nation on the nate test in eighth grade with readers wrshgz eighth grade. we started out in year one, and our eighth graders that went through pre-k and full day kindergarten, and for us with all of the english as second language cities that we have for us to be number one in reading was extraordinary, and it came from an investment. that investment has to go all wait through, and you're right, quality of teachers. we had a program called keystone star
ability to survey cities. when all that starts coming home and you start getting into this tom cruise "minority report" sort of micro-drones outside your house sur veiling you, that's the next question. i think most americans they just don't understand what it is. they support it because it keeps them sane. they don't know the technicalities. >> it's two conversations we're really having. one is the operational features of drones. the other is the legal features of the drone program. i think let's put aside the legal features question right now. operationally drones do serve a purpose. we could theoretically be putting boots on the ground in yellen and pakistan and are all complication with that, and never in the history of warfare have there ever been things without collateral damage. what this does essentially is it tries as best it can to limit the boots on the ground, and there is still classral damage, and that's awful, obviously, but in terms of warfare, operationally, drones do have a defensible purpose. the question is what is the side effects of it, and what are the legal arg
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)